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Red fox

Red fox

“The red fox (Vulpes vulpes), largest of the true foxes, has the greatest geographic range of all members of the Carnivora family, being present across the entire Northern Hemisphere from the Arctic Circle to North Africa, North America and Eurasia. Its range has increased alongside human expansion, having been introduced to Australia, where it is considered harmful to native mammals and bird populations.
Outside the breeding season, most red foxes favour living in the open, in densely vegetated areas, though they may enter burrows to escape bad weather. Their burrows are often dug on hill or mountain slopes, ravines, bluffs, steep banks of water bodies, ditches, depressions, gutters, in rock clefts and neglected human environments.

Social and territorial behaviour

Red foxes either establish stable home ranges within particular areas or are itinerant with no fixed abode.[38]:117 They use their urine to mark their territories.[44] A male fox raises one hind leg and his urine is sprayed forward in front of him, whereas a female fox squats down so that the urine is sprayed in the ground between the hind legs.[45] Urine is also used to mark empty cache sites, used to store found food, as reminders not to waste time investigating them.[38]:125 [46][47] The use of up to 12 different urination postures allows them to precisely control the position of the scent mark.[48] Red foxes live in family groups sharing a joint territory. In favourable habitats and/or areas with low hunting pressure, subordinate foxes may be present in a range. Subordinate foxes may number one or two, sometimes up to eight in one territory. These subordinates could be formerly dominant animals, but are mostly young from the previous year, who act as helpers in rearing the breeding vixen’s kits. Alternatively, their presence has been explained as being in response to temporary surpluses of food unrelated to assisting reproductive success. ”
(Source-Wikipedia)